Human Library Catalogue

Short – story collection – small and interesting:

I am:

A Breast Cancer Survivor -  A Lesbian -  A person who has experienced both a still birth and an ectopic pregnancy. In my short story collection I am willing to share openly and honestly with my readers. Becoming a Human Library Book is quicker than writing a printed book and will be challenging – both to myself and others.

Our ‘New Normal’:

My child has been diagnosed with DMD – Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy- dealing with misconceptions and the realities of my child’s condition – I am an author too who has made it a mission to celebrate the differences. I believe everyone has a story to tell and everyone who needs to hear it should have access. We have faced Anxiety, Stress, Judgement – the doctors got it wrong, your child looks fine…, Stereotypes – why can he walk if he’s in a wheelchair-, Grief – knowing your child has a limited life, Joy – in the small things.

Trans Gender:

I am a Transgendered woman.My preferred pronouns are She, Her, Ms. I am well known within my community in rural Taranaki.I am proud and confident.The Human Library concept sounds cool and I would like to share my life experiences with any person who wishes to get to know me better.

Anxiety – Always Anxious:

People believe that my anxiety is me. That is not true. People see my anxiety and assume what I can and can’t do. This is unfair because people judge me when they only know my anxiety, they don’t even bother to get to know ME. I have been an in-patient in psychiatric wards a number of times. This in itself comes with so many prejudices and stereotypes. If you have never been in a psych ward you might base your opinion of it on what you see in the media, in movies and tv. I would love to be able to tell people the reality of psych wards and try to put a stop to some of that stereotypical thinking. I would love to share my story of mental illness, of being inside the mental health system and the struggle it brings. I would love to share my story of recovery and how anxiety will always be something that is in my life, but how that is something I am okay with. I would love to challenge how people think about psychiatric patients and also to challenge people’s stereotypes about what somebody with severe anxiety can or can’t do. I would love to share some of the ways that this society we live in makes life so much harder for people struggling with mental illness and some simple ways that we as a society can be more accepting of people with mental illness. Never judge a book by its cover

I am a happy, confident young lady who lives life to the fullest. I don’t let anything hold me back from giving everything I want to give a go. However, because I look so different, I often come across people who assume so much about me or presume that because I look a certain way I cannot do certain things. People have called me names in the past and I often get stared at. I have given inspirational talks, ran a half marathon and tried to be an example to all people that no matter your abilities, you can achieve anything.

Never judge a book by it’s cover:

I am a happy, confident young lady who lives life to the fullest. I don’t let anything hold me back from giving everything I want to give a go. However, because I look so different, I often come across people who assume so much about me or presume that because I look a certain way I cannot do certain things. People have called me names in the past and I often get stared at. I have given inspirational talks, ran a half marathon and tried to be an example to all people that no matter your abilities, you can achieve anything.

Matua:

As a child with other children of different nationalities, we were just children and played as such. As I grew older and became an adult and progressed into the adult world or working and studying, I started to experience prejudice, an example of this is going to a whanau Tangi (funeral) and non-Maori comments “Another excuse for a party” not understanding our concept around our funeral process.

I like the concept of sharing my life experiences through my culture which will hopefully help give others a clear understanding and awareness of the beauty of my culture, through my life experiences.

Baby Loss Survivor:

We lost our son Alex in 2011, during pregnancy. I am happy to talk about his loss and how SANDS supported me and now how I help support others. I can discuss pregnancy and parenting post baby loss, and how we remember our son/big brother. Also I emigrated to New Zealand in 2004 and know what it is like having no family around for support. I think being a Human book will bring new connections and allow me to share my knowledge with people who are interested.

No child should go without:

People often don’t understand the ‘Why’ for the Kai Kitchen and have said to me ‘you are enabling parents, you need to stop.’ I’d like to share the story of ‘Why’. And I have an idea of what others are thinking and where they are coming from, as I too hadn’t realised many of the things that were happening in our community. It’s that old chestnut of ‘you don’t know what you don’t know’.